By now you already know about Nike, the athletic shoe company named for a Greek goddess that is based in Oregon and started by a college track star and his coach. You know that Nike was founded in 1964 and that that Swoosh was also created by a college student.

Moreover, you know that Nike is the leading athletic shoe and apparel maker in the US, bagging over 50 percent of the nation’s sales by 1980. But did you know that one of Nike’s often overlooked products is their sweatbands, featuring what they call Dri-FIT technology. Don’t worry if you have never heard of it (we hadn’t either), because Nike actually builds it automatically into their shoes, their coats, their sock, their sweatbands, and more.

World of Nike Sweatband, Shoes, and Apparel

Nowadays, Nike rakes in around 4.3 billion dollars a year and their catchphrase, “Just Do It!” is currently ranked as one of the top five all times ad catchphrases by the Smithsonian Institute. Nike already had a long tradition of making great products out of high-quality materials when they acquired Converse in 2017. The move all but cemented the company’s’ reign over athletic wear in the country, and anything with the Michael Jordan Air symbol on it (owned by Nike) is equally untouchable in terms of popularity and sales.

But where does that lead to lowly sweatband? Well, it may not get much glory, but the Nike sweatband is one of the most ubiquitous forms of attire used in all of the pro sports. In basketball, you can almost picture them standing there, instantly recognizable, in part, because of the body adornment that unites them. You would not catch Al Harrington, Paul Pierce, Carmelo Anthony, or LeBron James on the court without one, and their names are all but synonymous with the largely unheralded headband.

Nike has many NBA licensing contract, and, In football, too their sweatband cannot be escaped. And, according to LIVESTRONG, players in the NFL and at the college level have been known to wear bicep bands (arm sweatbands) on one and sometimes both arms. The ritual is so popular, in fact, that “Nike and the NFL also have their own lines of logo-endorsed bicep bands.” NFL players who wear these bands include New York Giants linebacker Danny Clark, New York Jets safety Kerry Rhodes.

And what about baseball? Well, according to an article by USA Today, the league has adopted quarterback-style wristbands for catchers to help with play-calling since the MLB changed its rule governing the number of the mound before the start of the 2018 season.

The bands will feature that same moisture-wicking stay-dry technologies, but will also include a then plastic sleeve into which a notecard with game notes. Look closely at catcher in the Bigs during a game and you are bound to see him do a funny thing: pull out something from nooks and crannies of his chest protect and start to scribble on his wrist, like some double agent or secret spy.

According to the article, catchers including David Ross, and Yasmani Grandal have already used them, and Martin Maldonado (Angels) and Willson Contreras (Cubs) are also believed to have jumped on the data-driven sweatband bandwagon. And why not resort to a wristband cheat sheet? Many teams carry 30 or more pitchers with at least two sets of signals for pitchers and base runners. Whew! That’s a lot to remember, even for the quarterbacks of baseball.

Nike Baseball Sweatbands and Wristbands and Dri-FIT

So, we have established that Nike baseball sweatbands and wristbands are used in many pro sports, but let’s take a closer look at some of the Nike sweatband products, like the wristband. These bands are moisture absorbent and moisture-wicking and feature the classic Swoosh logo embroidered at the center.

Available in a variety of block colors (sorry no wacky prints) that include black, blue white, gray, and red, reportedly, one size fits most, and the band measures 3 inches wide. They come in a set of two and are made from materials that include cotton, nylon, rubber, polyester, and spandex.

This proprietary blend accounts for the major part of Nike’s Dri-FIT technology and will keep your skin dry and comfortable, but it will also fit correctly due to the stretchy nature of the materials. That makes them popular in tennis, basketball, football, and as Nike baseball sweatbands.

Plus the new The Nike Dri-Fit Armbands are double wristbands that can be worn on the wrist or the forearm. Popular for use with gymnastics, boxing, biking, and more, these bands can provide extra moisture absorption when you need it most. And they are stylish. The pair comes with a black base on one side and a grey one on the reverse side, and Each band is 5-inches in length, according to this description, which provides a snug fit.

Also, the unisex product will appeal to both male and female athletes and the materials used in its construction repel moisture and keep your skin cool and dry. It is thought that the bands are comprised of 95% nylon, 1% spandex, and 4% rubber material, and the bands are, by all accounts, strong, comfortable and light.

Even baseball players have used them as Nike baseball sweatbands, as they fit comfortably around the wrist and arm without becoming too tight while in use. The tightly knitted fabric allows the skin to continue to breathe without restricting blood flow or muscle movement, it is machine washable, and it is extremely durable.

The classic black and white classic wristband version will run you around $12 on Amazon, and it has earned the Editor’s Choice Award there, while the Dri-Fit Armbands will cost about 20 dollars.

Nike Swoosh Headbands and Fury Headbands

The Nike Swoosh Headband has been around for years and it is essential for basketball, jogging, and other sports when you often have to use your hand for thing other than to wipe away sweat. While it may not have a natural use as a Nike baseball sweatband, will hold your hair in place or keep sweat out of your eyes.

This band is comprised of 69% Cotton, 26% Nylon, and 5% Rubber, according to one reviewer, and the end product is machine washable and line dryable. Again, there is a classic embroidered Swoosh logo at the center of the width measure two inches across. Pick up a Swoosh Headband today on Amazon for about $9 dollars.

Nike is reportedly confident in the moisture absorbing properties of this product that, according to one article, the offer a 99 percent absorption guarantee. professionals as they are guaranteed 99% of water absorption. Plus, the cotton-nylon blend is very soft, and it holds its shape well and is easy to put on and take off.

Moreover, the Nike Fury Headbands are the new addition to Nike sweatband, and their composition is a little different than they’re predecessor. 60 percent nylon, 8 percent spandex, and 32 percent polyester seem to make for and more effective moisture-wicking mix and the Jacquard Swoosh logo is displayed prominently on the center of the band.

This sweatband is an elite performer, and it is great for cyclists and football players, or anyone who sweats profusely during workouts. Plus, the band is probably one of the thickest bands Nike makes, and the added spandex and silicone should ensure the headband doesn’t lose its shape over time and stays in place on your forehead, even during times of high moisture.

The durability and stretchiness of materials also mean that the headband is super easy to get on and take off, although at ⅜ of an inch in width, the super trim band will feel a little different to some folks. Still, maximum absorption, durability, and toughness give this band an extreme sports kind of appeal.

Nike Premiere Headbands Make Great Baseball Sweatbands

These highly absorbent sports headbands are a great product for any sport that requires a high level of activity, and the key to the moisture management lies in a multi-layer solution that is reversible and features Dri-Fit materials made of rubber, polyester, and nylon

This combination is extremely good at absorbing moisture and keeping it away from the skin, and an inner layer of cotton adds extra cushioning and allows breathability. Plus, it is extremely durable, wash after wash. The 2-inch headband makes for the perfect Nike baseball sweatband, as it is extremely thin, soft, and comfortable, which mean that it can fit almost everyone comfortably thanks to the stretchy polyester and high-rubber content material. It is also soft, and at times you may not notice it is in your head.

Three main colors are available, as this item is meant to be performance apparel first and fashion second: red, black and gray. It only comes in one size but is meant to be a one-size-fit-most accessory and it is definitely the best of the Nike baseball ball sweatbands.

Halo Headbands Wrapup

So, now you have seen the Nike baseball sweatbands, from the wrist and armband to the headband. Only you can determine the best Nike baseball sweatbands for you, but you can be confident that whatever Nike product you buy it will be comfortable, moisture wicking, and durable.

Nike has long been known for using high-quality materials and their use of rubber, acrylics fabrics, nylon, and polyester make for a product that can take a lot of abuse and washes and not lose its shape. Their Dri-Fit technology is really the key and their classic logo and variety of color choices only help to reaffirm Nike’s popularity. Plus, there is one product that we didn’t talk too much about that is extremely popular in baseball as of late.

The Nike Pro Combat Dri-Fit Playcoach has all but been officially adopted by many MLB teams in lieu of the league’s decision to limit total visits to the mound per nine innings to six. The sweatbands over an extra large multipage playbook window, the same proven Dri-Fit technology of other lines, belt loop, improved contouring for long-lasting comfort, and micro hook and loop technology allows for easy access to the playbook.

Moreover, the band is 6.7-inches in length, and one size fits most. The material composition is reported to be 38% tpu (thermoplastic polyurethane), 29% nylon, 17 percent polyester, and 9 percent spandex, and the band cost under $20.

Would you expect anything less from a company that took at that 3.4 billion last year, and hold many pro and college sports contracts they have to back it up?

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